Archive

Archive for November, 2010

Converted Irish Church

Built in 1835, the picture above is all that remained of the church when the new owners purchased this derelict and roofless shell.  The renovations carried out are truly amazing.

The full story and more pictures can be found here:- http://pigtown-design.blogspot.com/2010/03/kilgallan-ireland-church-conversion.html

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Converted St Stephen’s, Hampstead UK

St Stephen’s, which is considered to be one of London’s finest Victorian Gothic Churches, had been standing empty and neglected for more than 30 years.

Completed in 1869, the church doors finally closed for worship in 1977 as congregations dwindled, and the building fell into a derelict state.

In 1999, the St Stephen’s Restoration and Preservation Trust was awarded a lease to restore the church, which saw it transformed into a multi-purpose event space, and breathing new life into the old building.

More information and photos can be found at:- http://londonist.com/2009/01/st_stephens_second_chance.php?gallery0Pic=3#gallery

Here are some photos during the restoration of this grand building.

Catholic Church Converted to Restaurant and Brewery – Pittsburgh, PA

Founded in 1878, this Catholic Church served the Lawrenceville area of Pittsburgh, and over the years survived a fire, flooding, and the depression.

The doors finally closed in 1993 and the building underwent extensive renovations. In 1996 The Church Brew Works opened for business.

Painstaking effort was used when the renovation of the church and the rectory was undertaken. Attention to detail and the reuse of existing fixtures all help to create a spectacular atmosphere. 

The reddish orange hue of the flooring comes from the original Douglas Fir floors. These floors were uncovered and meticulously restored after lying dormant under plywood for 50 years. 

 By far, the most breathtaking element is the position of the brew house on the altar. Because the altar was built as a centerpiece of the church, the steel and copper tanks gleaming in the celestial blue backdrop is nothing less than captivating. 

For more information and photos see:- http://www.churchbrew.com/

The Church Café, Bar, Restaurant, Club – Dublin, Ireland

The former St. Mary’s Church of Ireland is one of the earliest examples of a galleried church in Dublin. Built at the beginning of the 18th century, it boasts many outstanding features, such as the Renatus Harris built organ and spectacular stained glass windows.

St. Mary’s closed in 1964 and lay derelict for a number of years until it was purchased by John Keating in 1997, who undertook extensive restorations, before re-opening the doors in 2005 as John M. Keating’s Bar.

In 2007 the building was acquired by new owners and renamed “The Church Bar & Restaurant” and its range of services was expanded to include a Café, Juice Bar, Night Club and a Barbeque area on the terrace.

It is certainly a place I would like to sit and have a few cold ones in, and the menu looks devine.

For more information and photos see here:- http://www.thechurch.ie/

Converted Church built in 1852 – Tasmania

This is a beautifully converted Church, built in 1852.  Situated in Hobart, Tasmania, it is a private home known as Pendragon Hall, and has the honor of being listed as #19 of the Top 50 homes in Tasmania. 

The building,  formerly known as St John the Baptist Church has stylish accommodation, amazing architecture and an extensive history, effortlessly combining modern luxury with old world charm.

Pendragon Hall features an open plan spacious living room with a cosy fireplace, kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and two garden courtyards.  Of course, let’s not overlook the enormous stained glass windows which would be the envy of any Converted Church owner.

Currently listed for sale at AUD$1,350,000.

See the Website for more information and photos:- http://www.homehound.com.au/120+goulburn+street+hobart+tas+7000/12377918

Converted Catholic Chapel – The Netherlands

Located in The Netherlands, this building is a former Catholic church that has been converted into a private home.  

The most striking feature is the choice of almost all-white interior surfaces.  The furnishings and decor are kept minimalistic and abstract, which keeps the architecture itself at the forefront as the defining feature of the space. 

I also love how they have kept the pipe organ (imagine playing THAT at dinner parties) and how the light reflects off the magnificent stained glass windows.

For more information and photos see here:- http://www.zecc.nl/Projecten/Herbestemming_wonen_werken/project/1/Converted_chapel_into_a_residence_Utrecht,_the_Netherlands?projectSection=1&photo=1

Converted Christ Church Tower – Built In 1687

Christ Church Greyfriars, also known as Christ Church Newgate, is an Anglican church located in the City of London.  Built first in the gothic style, then in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren in 1687, it ranked among the City’s most notable pieces of architecture and places of worship.

The church was destroyed in the Second World War during the Blitz in 1940. A firebomb struck the roof and tore into the nave. Much of the surrounding neighbourhood was also set alight. 

In 2002, the Christ Church site got a major renovation and archeological examination. In 2006, work was completed to convert the tower and spire into a modern twelve-level private residence.  The spire is 160ft high, offering spectacular views of the City.  The good news for house hunters wary of climbing hundreds of stairs, is that this 3 bedroom converted church tower has a lift. 

More photos can be found here:- http://www.boyarskymurphy.com/cctb.htm